The Bodhisattva Response to Coronavirus by Jack Kornfield

“Dear Friends,

 

We have a choice.

Epidemics, like earthquakes, tornadoes and floods, are part of the cycle of life on planet Earth.

How will we respond?

With greed, hatred, fear and ignorance? This only brings more suffering.

Or with generosity, clarity, steadiness and love?

This is the time for love.

 

Time for Bodhisattvas. In Buddhist teachings, the Bodhisattva is someone who vows to

alleviate suffering and brings blessings in every circumstance. A Bodhisattva chooses to

live with dignity and courage and radiates compassion for all, no matter where they find

themselves.

 

This is not a metaphor. As Bodhisattvas we are now asked to hold a certain measure of

the tragedy of the world and respond with love.

 

The Bodhisattva path is in front of us. The beautiful thing is, we can see Bodhisattvas all

around. We see them singing from their balconies to those shut inside. We see them in

young neighbors caring for the elders nearby, in our brave healthcare workers and the

unheralded ones who stock the shelves of our grocery stores.

 

As a father, if she called me, I would fly to the ends of the earth to help and protect my

daughter. Now she and her firefighter/paramedic husband and my toddler grandson

await the virus. His urban fire department, like many hospitals and first responders,

does not have masks. Eighty percent of their work is emergency medical calls and they

all expect to get the virus. They will not be tested, because the department can’t afford to

lose the help of too many of their firefighters.

 

What can I do? What can we do?

 

In this moment we can sit quietly, take a deep breath, and acknowledge our fear and

apprehension, our uncertainty and helplessness… and hold all these feelings with a

compassionate heart. We can say to our feelings and uncertainty, “Thank you for trying

to protect me,” and “I am OK for now.” We can put our fears in the lap of Buddha, Mother

Mary, Quan Yin, place them in the hearts of the generations of brave physicians and

scientists who tended the world in former epidemics.

 

When we do, we can feel ourselves part of something greater, of generations of survivors

in the vast web of history and life, “being carried” as the Ojibwa elders say, “by great

winds across the sky.”

 

This is a time of mystery and uncertainty. Take a breath. The veils of separation are

parting and the reality of interconnection is apparent to everyone on earth. We have

needed this pause, perhaps even needed our isolation to see how much we need one

another.

 

Now it is time to add our part.

The Bodhisattva deliberately turns toward suffering to serve and help those around in

whatever way they can.

This is the test we have been waiting for.

We know how to do this.

 

Time to renew your vow.

Sit quietly again and ask your heart: what is my best intention, my most noble aspiration

for this difficult time?

Your heart will answer.

Let this vow become your North Star. Whenever you feel lost, remember and it will

remind you what matters.

 

It is time to be the medicine, the uplifting music, the lamp in the darkness.

Burst out with love. Be a carrier of hope.

If there is a funeral, send them off with a song.

 

Trust your dignity and goodness.

Where others hoard…..help.

Where others deceive……stand up for truth.

Where others are overwhelmed or uncaring…..be kind and respectful.

 

When you worry about your parents, your children, your beloveds, let your heart open

to share in everyone’s care for their parents, their children and their loved ones. This is

the great heart of compassion. The Bodhisattva directs compassion toward everyone—

those who are suffering and vulnerable and those who are causing suffering. We are in

this together.

 

It is time to reimagine a new world, to envision sharing our common humanity, to

envision how we can live in the deepest most beautiful way possible. Coming through

this difficulty, what we intend and nurture, we can do.

 

In the end, remember who you are is timeless awareness, the consciousness that was

born into your body. You were born a child of the spirit, and even now you can turn

toward the awareness, and become the loving awareness that witnesses yourself reading

and feeling and reflecting.

 

When a baby is born our first response is love.

When a dear one dies, the hand we hold is a gesture of love.

Timeless love and awareness are who you are.

Trust it.

 

Dear Bodhisattva,

The world awaits your compassionate heart.

Let’s join in this great task together.

 

With metta,

Jack”

 

The Bodhisattva Response to Coronavirus

 

My Anxiety and the Unknown; COVID- 19

I am all over the place lately, leaping from fear to peace. I am reflecting what is happening all over the globe: Chaos and fear, yet a slowing down of activities. Sometimes I obsess about all kinds of things: Will I get this illness? Will I die a horrible death? Do I have enough tp? What if one of my caregivers gets sick and spreads the virus to others? What if I am left with no caregivers? How do I clean properly? Did I wipe down the doorknobs after someone left? What if I forgot? Anxiety loves this kind of stuff. It thrives on it.

And then, suddenly I am peaceful and feel wide open and content. Calm. And more connected to nature. The trees around my house seem more vibrant than ever. I watch the ducks in the pond happily waddling about, and I breathe more deeply. The red-winged blackbirds sing their delight at being alive and dive in and out of the cattails. Sometimes I go outside and sit on the earth and cry. I don’t know what I’m crying about, but tears run down my face. I sob. It feels good to do so. And I feel supported by the earth when I do.

Yesterday, while I was out there, Simon, our cat, came and sat with me and then curled up in my lap. We both surveyed the pond, the meadow, the hills. And I thought: If all humankind died, the earth  would heal and that thought gave me peace. I love my friends, family and community, and sometimes am able to love all humankind, but, as my mother used to say, “We are the most destructive species on the planet.” She was right and it’s a hard fact to sit with.

Sometimes, I open my heart to not knowing. Not knowing if certain people I know and love will survive. Not knowing if local businesses will survive. Not knowing how long the virus will survive. And these thoughts take me to the big “I Don’t Know” – the mysteries of The Universe. And this thought leads to Freedom.

 

 

Creativity

“The artist is a receptacle for emotions that come from all over the place: from the sky, from the earth, from a scrap of paper, from a passing shape, from a spider’s web.”                                                                                                                                                ~ Pablo Picasso

 

The following is another excerpt from my unfinished book.

Creativity

Years ago, during a meditation session, I realized we are beings that are constantly creating, if only in our thoughts. I also realized that when we are in the act of creating something, we are connecting with Creation itself. A special relationship is forged as we link up with that essence, and we feel energized, plugged-in, an open channel. Any act of creation begins with that connection and ends with an outer expression of that connection. This process is healing as we feel those creative juices flow through us and we find yet another way to connect with our innermost self.

Finding a creative outlet can be very useful for those of us with chronic health challenges. Instead of vegging-out in front of the TV, getting lost in cyberspace for hours, or spiraling into depression or anxiety, we can focus our energy toward something that really nourishes our spirit.  When we are being creative, we can shift our mood and

Artist - Depression Mystical Animals
From Emma Taggart    “My Modern    Met”       Artist Dawid Planeta

redirect that energy, transforming the chaos of fear or despair into the exciting chaos of creativity and by doing so, free up any numb, stuck places. It gives us a constructive outlet for all that we experience.

Being creative doesn’t require a certain level of expertise. Anyone can pick up a pen or a paintbrush. What is required, is a desire to play, to experiment, to explore, and to listen to what wants to be expressed. It also doesn’t mean you have to end up with a polished finished product. The outcome is often beside the point. Being creative can be as simple as playing your favorite music while dancing in your kitchen, or doodling on a piece of paper while you wait in a doctor’s office. It doesn’t mean you have to write a novel or to be published to write, or paint a landscape and have an art show to dabble in watercolors, which is really good news for those of us with limited energy. What’s important is to be engaged in the process and to allow the creative force to move through you with as little constraint as possible.

Most of us, at one time or another, experience blocks in our creativity. I think a large percentage of the time the reason for this is the critical voices in our head: “I’m too old for this”, “I’ve never taken a class”, “this is stupid”, or “Debra is really good at this – I’ll never be as good as her”.

During meditation, when critical voices arise, I try to recognize their tones for what they are, and to the best of my ability, take note of them and continue meditating. They can be handled the same way in regard to creativity. When the critic starts in, we can just say hello and continue what we’re doing. If it persists, we can set aside what we’re doing and take out a journal and let the voices have their say. We can write it all out as if they were talking and write until we can’t write any more. We may uncover something useful: We may recognize the voice of our mother, or our second grade teacher. Then, when we’re through, we can go back to writing that poem, creating that dance, painting that picture.

Another way of freeing up blocks is to try a different outlet for a bit. If we’re blocked with the still-life we’re painting, we can try our hand at a clay sculpture, or pick up the kazoo. There is something about trying out a different venue that can free up stuckness in another. It may be just that by taking a break from your particular creative endeavor and putting your attention elsewhere that makes a difference, or just allowing space for the flow of creativity, but I’ve seen this happen many times within myself.

Image Maluma Drummer Girl

Tapping into the creative can be a powerful and intense process that can have the side effect of bringing about a healing catharsis. I have a friend who began to have memories of early childhood sexual abuse. She started to make abstract pictures – nonverbal expressions of what she went through so long ago. She had never tried her hand at art before, but suddenly felt a compelling need to do so. During the process, she became possessed – spending hours working on them, for weeks. Afterwards, she had a series of probably ten pictures, which she shared with friends. The pictures were haunting and disturbing, especially the first ones, and then they became lighter and more hopeful, reflecting her inner process.

Another friend of mine had a car accident and suffered head trauma. She ultimately had to leave her job, because of her incapacitating symptoms. The accident changed her life completely and she was obviously distraught. She, too, began to make abstract pictures with an urgent need to express herself. Making these pictures became her main focus, churning out several pictures daily.

Creating an expression of your particular health challenge may be something you want to do.

Also, finding an outlet that is non-verbal can reach into the deepest parts of ourselves          that are beyond words, and

         2019-11-05 (3)                                                                                                                                                                   can satisfy a profound need in us.           

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Credits: Playing for Change “Everyday People” video on YouTube

 

One particular hard time in my life, I was experiencing partial seizures regularly. Because of cognitive problems, describing in words how my body felt was too difficult for me, so I drew a picture instead that was

Drawing Whole Body Electrical Dance
Maluma – Inner-body Experience

much more expressive of my inner experience. Everyone I showed it to, had a visceral reaction to it that gave me a sense that they understood how it must feel to be me, leaving me feeling more connected with them and less isolated, altogether.

 

 

Image Frida Kahlo Without Hope1945
“Without Hope” Frida Kahlo, 1945

When I’m not feeling well, but want to dabble in something new and different, I can easily become overwhelmed and can’t think of what I’d like to do. When that’s the case, I choose from a list of things I made up when I was feeling better. You might want to do the same for yourself. The following is a list you might want to consider, made up of activities that range in energy level.

Try this: Take a small jar and fill it with some dried beans. Put on your favorite music and shake your new, instant percussion instrument.

Try this: Take out a pad of paper and pick a topic, any topic, and for the next ten minutes, write without stopping and no crossing out. Just let your mind take off. This technique was developed by Natalie Goldberg, who has written many books on writing as a spiritual practice (1986). To stimulate your creativity, I highly recommend Julia Cameron’s books.

Try this: Make a collage. Your library or your doctor’s office may have old magazines that they’ll let you have. Bring the magazines home and cut out images and/or phrases that appeal or inspire you. Have fun with it. You may want to have a theme in mind when you do it, or just want to create something of beauty you can look at later.

Try this: Buy a cardstock and envelopes at a craft store. Use some of the images you cut out for collages and in no time flat, you have pretty cards for various occasions.

Try this: Make a model from a store-bought kit.

Try this: Buy adult coloring books at your local bookstore. Instead of using crayons to color with, buy a small set of watercolors, instead.

Try this: Buy a set of colored pencils and a pad.                                                                                                                                Put on your favorite music and                                                                                           let yourself go.                           

 

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Credit: Playing for Change “Love Train” video on YouTube

Image Kids Dancing hiphop pluspng.com
Credit: Transparent PNG Images

  

Try this: Go to the library, to the arts and crafts section and peruse. If something catches your eye, check it out.

 

Try this: Make a list of all the creative hobbies you’ve always wanted to do. Remember how you’ve always wanted to knit a sweater? Now’s the time.

Try this: Go for a walk. Collect pine cones, sticks, shells, a feather.  Buy an embroidery hoop at a craft store. Make a mobile.

Image Chorale Angel City Africa from Sunnyskyz
Credit to Sunny Skyz: The Angel City Chorale performs Toto’s “Africa.”

 

Consider this: Creativity with others.

The other day, when feeling too ill to write, I took out my colored pencils and pad of pages, and my caregiver and I made some drawings. I decided my cats were the perfect inspiration.

Drawing Zoe the Beautiful        Drawing Queen Regina

Try this: Using watercolors, colored pencils, pastels or??? and a big pad of paper, create an abstract picture of your symptoms. Don’t overthink this … just grab colors that speak to you, and go. Because symptoms fluctuate, you may want to do a series of pictures. What was it like to do this? How do you feel afterwards?

“The idea is like a blueprint; it creates an image of the form, Drawing Day 9 I decide I like Valiumwhich then magnetizes and guides the physical energy to flow into that form and eventually manifests it on the physical plane”. ~ Shakti Gawain  

Drawing Jumping Out of My Skin  “In a general sense, all artists are shamans, insomuch as they are channeling images or concepts on behalf of the collective”.  ~ Vicki Noble 

Drawing When Someone Asks Me How I'm Doing\

DEAFinitely Dope: Handing rap music to the deaf

2019-11-16 (4) Matt Maxey was diagnosed with profound hearing loss at an early age but has made music his life’s passion.  DEAFinitely Dope: Handing rap music to the deaf Matt Maxey was diagnosed with profound hearing loss at an early age but has made music his life’s passion. 

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