I Said I Would be Honest

I said I would be honest

So here it goes:

This is one of those days.

Those days I feel seizury,

which doesn’t mean I’ll have a grand mal seizure

but will feel like I can’t figure things out.

I will slur my words and feel blurry

and want to cry and feel like

I don’t belong in this world

and why am I here, really, why???

I am not suicidal, but I hope I don’t

live a long life so how’s that for honesty?

This blog helps me gives me purpose and

meaning and I just hope it helps

someone, even just one person.

Today is a “TV day” where I can’t

do much but watch reality shows and

shows that aren’t too complicated.

I have a caring caregiver here (better

than an uncaring one!) and so that

makes things better. I have a partner

that suffers too, who loves me and

has loved me for years and will love me

for years to come. There are three kitties

too: Reggie, Zoe and Simon, all of who

I adore, so I guess, why complain?

But today, right now, well I wish I

could feel better and think better and

SLEEP!!!

and I know when I bring my attention

to the present moment

Right here, right now

I am ok

this epilepsy, insomnia, anxiety

can bring me to my knees

again and again

so while I’m here

I might as well kiss the earth

and say “thank you”

which breaks my heart open

which teaches me how to love

which is why we are all here.

~Maluma

 

Cari

Cari Looking to the Right (2)

I walk into Cari’s room. The lights

are dim and the TV is on. When she looks

up at me from her recliner, I notice she is

squinting.

“Oh. Migraine”, I say, keeping my

words to a minimum.

She sighs. “Yup”.

“Again”.

“Yup”.

“I’m sorry. I’ll be quick. I want to let you know a caregiver won’t be coming today, after all”.

“Oh. Who was on”?

“Liza”, I say.

And then I quietly leave the room, closing

the door gently behind me.

As I return to the living room, I reflect on our relationship. Cari and I met through a mutual friend. I had heard she had epilepsy, too, and I really wanted to know how she managed.

I had a lot of compassionate friends, but I knew it would be different if I met someone who dealt with the same issues that I did. I wanted to know: how did she cope? Did she have seizures often? What kind? Did she take meds? Were they under control?

We eventually got together and shared information, and shortly thereafter, became friends. The friendship turned into attraction and we fell in love. A year later, we exchanged vows in a wedding ceremony in our front yard.

When I knew we were falling in love, when I knew this was a relationship I wanted to pursue, I realized at some point we would need help (I had learned in the first few months of knowing her that she had other health challenges, including debilitating migraines, chronic sinusitis, and what eventually culminated in arthritis throughout her body, due to past injuries and years of playing sports. On top of that, she occasionally walked in her sleep!). At first, this help came from friends who were willing to step in when we were both down for the count, mostly to do needed errands. But I knew as we aged, we would need more assistance.

Evening is my favorite time of day, because it means that Cari will come out of her den and we’ll watch TV together for a couple of hours before the caregiver shows up for the night. One of our cats (Reggie) curls up between us as we watch our favorite programs. It’s family time for us.

I love this ritual. We may not talk much, but that doesn’t matter; her presence is really all I need. She gives me something that no one else can, because she understands what it is like to live with chronic conditions and because some of those conditions overlap.

Over the past 25 years, we have seen each other through seizures, pain, emotional ups and downs, struggles with doctors, changes in medications and even menopause. We have figured it out. We get each other. And that gives me incredible comfort, and that is what has kept us together.

There are times, though, when one of us becomes insecure and wonders: Am I too much for her?

Here’s my response when it’s she that feels this way:

 

My Rock

 

You are my rock

not my hard place.

I lean back on your

solid stone so I can

feel the sun on my

face and the breeze

on my skin.

You are an artist.

You take the pieces of me

that are broken

– shattered shards –

and make them into

stained glass

the light singing through

all of the colors

not leaving even one of them out.

Cari and Maluma Peaceful (2)

 

Soul Mates

You are all my soul mates.

I cannot live without the

light that comes from your eyes.

If even one of you were to

turn away, I would not be able

to find my way Home.

 

So please, as tempting as

it may be, do not hide in

the cavern of dark secrets

and self-loathing.

I need you. You need me.

This is the raw Truth, my Loves.

 

I have tried many times to

go through life with only

a few cherished friends,

but each of you is essential

to me, and I know now

the same is true for you.

 

If we don’t realize this,

the Candle will either go out

altogether, or only flicker,

and not become the Beacon

it was meant to be.

 

Have I told you that

I need someone every night

by my side so I don’t die of fright?

Come close –

no closer still –

tell me your pain,

and I promise you,

I promise you,

I will not run.

 

My arms are spread out

like magnificent eagle wings.

I long to enfold you

in my wide wild embrace –

I am so eager to remind you

we are One, we are One.

by Maluma

The Interrelated Structure of Reality

“In a real sense, all of life is interrelated. All persons are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly. I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be, and you can never be what you ought to be until I am what I ought to be. This is the inter-related structure of reality.” ~ Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

 

 

Mariah Carey at Rite Aid

While standing in line at Rite Aid, I look over at the magazines at the counter. On the cover of People Magazine is a picture of Mariah Carey, with a caption revealing she has bipolar disorder. When I reach the counter, I take a copy and set it down with my other items to buy: a notebook and my favorite pens.

The cashier ringing me up glances down at the cover.

“Mariah Carey’s bipolar?”, she scowls.

“Seems like everybody’s bipolar these days. I think it’s just an excuse. They want attention, or they’re just weak-minded. Sometimes you just got to buck up”.

I look at her tight mouth and flashing eyes and wonder about her life. Does she just “buck up” and push through? Is that how she handles the difficulties of her life?

I must have a shocked look on my face, or maybe my mouth is tightening, because when she looks at me again, she says, modifying her tone, “or maybe she is bipolar”.

“Maybe more people are coming out about it, are being braver”, I suggest.

And with that exchange, I leave.

The conversation bothers me. It’s attitudes like hers that keep brain disorders and mental illness in the closet. All chronically ill people have to push harder to go through life. Mentally ill people have the added difficulty of having a stigma attached, making it hard to feel okay about having an illness that affects the mind.

Why is it such a stigma? The brain is part of the body, not separate from it. So why do we get so judgmental or frightened about mental illness and not as much or at all about other illnesses? Unless someone is violent, it seems no point in being afraid or protecting ourselves. Are we all just frightened of losing control, ourselves? Aren’t we all trying to keep it together on some level, at least some of the time?

Strictly speaking, bipolar disorder is a mood disorder, not a mental illness. For that matter, so is an anxiety disorder. If I’m honest, I feel a sense of relief that I am not labeled “mentally ill”, because I don’t want to be lumped with “those people”. I’m not a psychiatrist, but it seems to me that there is some sort of spectrum. You have people like me on one end, and a paranoid schizophrenic on the other. Am I a better, more respectable, likeable, deserving person because I’m more functional in the world? No.

Personally, I’m happy Mariah Carey is on the cover of People, telling her story. Kanye West gives no apologies for his bipolar disorder. I’m happy Howie Mandell is honest about his plethora of anxieties, even making us laugh about them. When well-known people are outspoken about their mood disorders and mental illness, I think it encourages others to do the same. Maybe by doing so, the stigma of mental illness can slowly slough off because of their willingness and courage; to be vocal about it and be themselves.

We have a long way to go. There needs to be a lot more education about all kinds of brain disorders, until shame is ditched and replaced with compassionate understanding. Everyone can come out of the closet and not fear condemnation. We all deserve to be respected, accepted and treated well by our doctors, friends, and community. We are all part of a greater whole and deserve to be recognized as such. Otherwise, there will remain a fracture in our humanity and we will all suffer from it. And I don’t want that. Do you?

“We’re one but we’re not the same. We need to carry each other”.  ~ Mary J. Blige

Excerpt from My “Book”

MEMORY:  THE JOURNEY BEGINS

I am thirteen and in the eighth grade and it is recess.  It is raining, so instead of going outside, I am in the classroom watching a few classmates pitch pennies against the wall.  The next thing I know, I am waking up in the nurse’s office groggy, confused and with a splitting headache.

My parents are told I went into convulsions.  Although they say nothing about what they are feeling, I feel their worry tighten around me like a pack of nervous dogs.  I feel no concern myself — after all, the next day after sleeping deeply I am fine and feel “normal” —what’s there to be afraid of?  However, my mother and I go to a doctor who refers us to a neurologist, and I take a test called an EEG (short for electroencephalogram) where wires are attached to my head and my brain waves are recorded.  Nothing unusual shows up in the results.  The incident remains a mystery. 

But not for long.  That summer I have another episode.  This time I have a feeling before it (what I later learn is called an aura) and a not unpleasant sensation of spinning out of my body—much like the feeling younger children get after twirling around and around.  Again, I come to groggy and headachy and all the muscles in my body ache like I’ve run a marathon.

This time my parents witness me convulsing, which of course escalates their fear.  Another appointment for an EEG is made.  Before I have a chance of going in for the test, I have another episode.  At this point I am still unaffected emotionally and don’t understand my parents’ mounting agitation.  Like the second incident, I get a split-second warning and then again feel the rush of spinning out of my body.  Yes, I come out of it disoriented and by body aching, but again the next day I am fine.  It never occurs to me that this could turn into any great difficulty.  Up until now I have been quite healthy and vivacious, the thought never enters my mind anything would change that.

This time when I take an EEG, the brain waves show up very spiky.  I am given a diagnosis:  epilepsy, and I am put on medication.  Unbeknownst to me, I have taken my first step onto the path of chronic illness.  My life has changed forever.

INTRODUCTION AND INITIATION TO LOSS

It took me many years before I realized my condition was chronic.  At first I thought my seizures would go away.  I had been “normal” up until then, and with that sense of normalcy came the assumption that I would return to that way of being.  Long term illness disability happened to other people…people to be pitied.  That wasn’t me.  As first, when I started on medication, I assumed that would fix by condition, but it didn’t and on top of that, there were side effects.  When I was in my twenties and still having seizures, I discovered “alternative medicine”.  I was very drawn to the concept that if one followed a natural course of treatment, one could cure oneself of anything.  There were plenty of testimonies that claimed this to be true.  I had no doubt if I followed a natural pathway to health that my body would “balance out” in some sort of magical way and I’d be seizure free.  I plunged wholeheartedly in this direction and giving up my anti-convulsant medication, which I believed would damage my liver, I began to take homeopathic remedies.  Along with that I stopped eating junk food and ate whole organic foods as much as possible.

Yet still my seizures continued.  When homeopathy wasn’t the cure-all; I assumed it would be, I just figured another alternative to Western medicine would be the one for me.  It was a long grueling process of trial and error with numerous medications and remedies before I came to realize that I would perhaps never cure my seizures, but instead find a way to manage them and that in fact my condition was chronic.  And until I would admit that, I couldn’t acknowledge loss.

Perhaps your story is like mine.  Or perhaps you’ve had a car accident or have suddenly contracted a debilitating illness.  Whichever the case, your symptoms persist no matter what you do.  At some point you realize your life has taken an abrupt detour and may never get back on track.  Wherever we are in the process we realize our lives have been changed.  And with that change we experience loss.

Our loss comes in many forms.  The obvious one is the physical changes we experience:  we no longer function the way we did in the past.  Our bodies don’t move the way they used to, we experience pain, have nausea.  When our symptoms are severe enough, it affects us to our core:  what can we depend on now?  It is not unlike experiencing an earthquake:  the very ground under our feet is shaky when we’ve always relied on it to be solid and assumed it would remain so. 

But that’s not all.  We may lose our job and our financial security, which of course effects us also on a survival level.  We may have to go on disability, unemployment or workman’s comp.  Often getting the help we need financially takes time, is a source of great frustration and adds to the fear we are already feeling.  If we had health insurance through our job, we may lose it.  Medical bills pile up and we’re not sure how we are going to pay them.  Sometimes we feel ashamed of our loss of financial footing.  Along with the loss of job security can be a loss of identity.  If our job was meaningful and fulfilling, we not only question how we can support ourselves, but who are we without this job title?  We start to lose our place in the world, and we’re not sure where we belong.

We may have started on medications for our on-going symptoms, which may help, but have side effects.  Ironically, something we take in hopes of improving our condition, may in other ways hinder us.  Pain medications may leave us in a fog.  Other medications may keep us up at night or cause our joints to ache.  This too adds to our loss.  We weigh it out if it’s worth it to keep up with the medications, and the process can be agonizing.

Friendships may fall by the wayside.  As first when we became ill, we got a lot of sympathy.  But as the days, months and years go by, that sympathy may dissipate. Friends we had so much in common with before, now back off, not knowing how to relate to us now.  Our former co-workers who we had so much in common with before, begin to fade from our lives.  Someone we used to go to the gym with regularly may not know how to be with us.  After not being able to go to social gatherings because we don’t feel well, the invitations slowly don’t come anymore.  We may not be able to go, but we feel left out.  We sense people’s fears and even judgement, or it may come out more blatantly.  We feel their pity in the form of well-intentioned advice or awkwardness which may cause us to retreat and feel betrayed.  We’re not sure how to relate either.  Our feelings are hurt and yet me may feel too in need of companionship and too confused ourselves in this new emotional landscape we find ourselves in to know how to communicate our needs. 

It may be hard to determine at first that what we are experiencing is loss.  We tend to associate loss with the death of a loved one or a break up, but a decline in health, whether rapid or gradual is not as well recognized as such.  There is much written about the phases of grief that Elizabeth Kubler-Ross presented when she studied those facing terminal illness.  The same can be applied to people with chronic health issues—although with us we cycle through some of the stages time and time again, sometimes all during one day.

We begin with a kind of denial or shock, the feeling of disbelief that this is happening to us, that I spoke of earlier.  Then we experience a range of emotions:  anger, resentment, bitterness, at times, and certainly sadness and fear.  We become depressed and experience shame and despair sometimes.  We are affected physically—we may feel tired, worn down.  We may lose weight, we may gain weight.  A kind of raw vulnerability develops—small upsets can affect us deeply and we become too overwhelmed to perform even the simplest of chores:  dishes and laundry pile up.  We feel lonely and isolated.  All these (symptoms) can come under the heading of “loss”.

We may not recognize ourselves and at times seem to lose even our personality.  Feeling lousy most of the time, our patience wears thin, and we become disagreeable or argumentative when we used to be lively and playful.  We are changing in front of our own eyes and we don’t like what we see.  This of course has an effect on our relationships, for we no longer exhibit the type of behavior we once did that people expect from us.

We also grieve our potential—who we could have been if we had continued to be in good health:  we may have got that promotion, bought that house.  We may have traveled more, done more volunteer work.  We may have had children, moved to our dream location.  Or we may have just continued as we were, because what we had felt was more fulfilling than what we seem to have now.  It is an odd phenomenon, this grieving for a possible future and yet it is as real as grieving for what once was.  It is as if alongside our real life with all it’s limitations, there is another life that is active and full of endless possibilities.  It is this life that we grieve for.                 

Acknowledging our health may never be what it once was and the components of loss that come with it is crucial to our moving forward in our life.  Coming to terms with our quality of health takes courage and requires a sobering honesty with oneself.  On the other hand, it also brings a certain amount of relief.  We let up on ourselves and stop pretending we are able-bodied.  We stop pushing ourselves so hard to try to live up to the expectations we once had when we had a higher level of energy.  We can be honest about our limitations and therefore begin to reconstruct a life that better reflects who we are now.  If we need financial assistance, we do what we can to get it.  If the friends we had before we were ill don’t support us or understand us, we begin to set about finding ones that do. 

CONTEMPLATION ON LOSS

When we take time to explore our loss, we find there is a poignant tenderness to it.  It is a feeling so deep in us that it can feel almost private and we may feel an awkwardness in knowing how to express it.  By investigating our broken heart, a moment here, a moment there, we have to set aside our fear constructed armor.  When we are able to touch our grief with a kind of careful compassion as we might touch a beloved, we discover the sacred within.  From this sacred place, can we see that the loss we feel is something we all share as part of the human condition?  My loss may come from a different source than yours, but the feeling is the same.  Can we, even if for a moment, recognize this shared awareness and let it move us in such a way that we can go through life with a heightened sense of compassion?  When we see the face of loss on others, regardless of the reason, can we now draw from our connectedness rather than our (imagined) separateness and reach out to others any way we can?  When we are able to do so, this kind of heartfelt awareness gives us a greater sense of meaning and purpose in our life.

Gradually, over time, we may come to realize that this sacred place is a place we’ve been longing to connect with and is a deep well of compassion that is endless and infinite.  Can we see that our path of loss has brought us to That-Which-Is-Never-Lost?  We have put up walls continually against such tenderness thinking it’s best to protect ourselves from pain, but now we realize that that never served us well.  Now that we can dip into that sacred well of compassion, we see that therein lies a strength and knowingness that serves us far better than our wall ever did.