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A Borrowed Blog: “It’s Time To Stop Avoiding Death: You can’t have the life you want without letting go of the life you have” by David Cates

I thank David Cates for permitting me to post this timely writing (original post March 30, 2020).

“It’s Time To Stop Avoiding Death: You can’t have the life you want without letting go of the life you have”

I’ve been stunned by how thoroughly a tiny virus, barely 0.0001″ across, has brought our human world screeching to a halt. In a few short months, on a global scale, it’s kicked over all the old bedrocks, nation by nation, and clearly revealed the dark, wriggly underworld hiding just out of sight.

That sense of unease we’ve had — about governments and politicians, scientists and institutions, economies built on hope and lies, nature gasping from our poisons, societies splintering into dry tinder — all that is laid bare. And in the deafening silence of shutdown, there’s nowhere else to look. The veil’s been lifted. The world’s turned upside down. The roots are rotten.

This is what we have become.

Some of us still sneak out to the streets; some pull the netflix covers over their eyes. But as the days wear on, in quarantine, we’re being forced to see our lives, our jobs, our relationships, and our selves without those layers of frantic busyness and protective gauze. Exposed. Naked, squinting at the sun, unsure who we are, uncertain what to do.

*

I’ve been meditating lately on the vast, hidden networks of nature: the mycelium, bacteria, microbiota and yes, the viruses. The original organisms from which complex lifeforms evolved, and likely, the ones who will take over again when humans disappear from this world, adapting to eat up our plastic pollution and radioactive waste, and more immediately, to compost our physical bodies as each of us dies.

Nature is a web, innumerable networks in constantly shifting yin/yang balance. Death is an essential element in that balance. Embracing death brings us back into harmony with the underlying game as it’s played in this world, at every scale, from insects to empires.

Resisting death puts us at odds with the whole natural order.

*

These past few years, I’ve been pulled down into an underworld initiation. I accompanied first my sister and then my mother through the final months of their lives, sitting with them as they took their last breaths. Death is ordinary, terrifying and beautiful all at once. It cracks our hearts open in a way that nothing else can.

So before this new virus appeared, I’d already made friends with the dark and wriggly worlds under those flipped-over rocks. My naked skin had goose-bumped in the cold shadows. I’d felt the grief pooling in my lungs, and seen the world strangely magnified through tears.

I may be a bit further along this path than some of you. But maybe not. For in the bright light of these revelation-times, many of us are showing our hidden battle scars and secret hurts, the ancestral wounds we carry, the loves we’ve lost — all the tiny deaths we’ve not yet mourned and celebrated.

Apocalypse: the uncovering. What happens when the Emperor has no clothes? What happens when I lose my job and social place? What happens when I’m locked in a house alone with my family? When we can’t get food or medicine? When one of us starts coughing? When my competent identity crumbles, and you see who I really am, underneath the facade?

*

I’ve been reluctant to speak these questions out loud.

Many people have reached out to me for soothing, for certainty, for reassurance that we’ll soon be back to normal. Uncharacteristically, I’ve been holding my tongue.

I don’t think we can go back to “normal”.

Forgetful as we human creatures are, I can’t unsee this revelation. On every level, from the meta and systemic to relational and personal, this is where we are now. In the midst of the sixth mass extinction, pounded by climate change, with 20,000 children dying of hunger every day.

Much of our generalized panic about this situation, I believe, is misplaced. We’re focused on personal human deaths, our own or our loved ones. But when I step back, relax my gaze and focus on the bigger pictures here, it’s clear what’s really dying.

Our old, “normal” world has been rotting on its deathbed for decades. That stench in my nostrils is not from a few thousand (or even, soon, a few million) human bodies.

The social order has already broken down, politics is lethal, and nature is drowning in poisons.

Underneath the rocks, below the foundations, the roots are rotten.

And everyone knows it.

Our avoidance of death hasn’t actually stopped our world from dying. It’s just left us delusional, little children with our eyes squeezed shut, fingers plugging our ears, tongues babbling nonononononono.

The coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has burst that dam of denial. It’s an equal opportunity killer, impacting every nation, rich and poor alike. No more bullshit. No more hiding.

Death is everywhere.

*

As we quarantine in place, isolated in our homes, the truth couldn’t be any plainer.

We can’t survive alone.

We’ve got to come together.

We’re social creatures, relying on each other for food, healing, touch, kindness, understanding, information, and a thousand other services.

Without others, we’re doomed.

And, as this current situation makes abundantly clear — as the virus passes from person to person, from hand to mouth to lungs — we’re also doomed with others.

Doomed if we do, and doomed if we don’t.

That’s the basic fact of life we have forgotten in our modern, go-go-go, scrambling-for-survival world.

Life is short. Death is certain.

Here it comes.

*

I’ve been short and ruthless with my closest friends and students. “I’ve made my peace with Death. You won’t find peace with this virus until you do, too.”

Certainly, protect yourselves and others in the ways that you can. Don’t be foolish. No need to race toward death.

But also don’t be foolish, thinking you can beat death forever.

Let’s take this precious time-out-of-time (while the world is holding its shocked breath, the rocks are kicked over and the curtain’s pulled back on the Wizard of Oz ) — and look deeply into why we’re all so terribly frightened of dying.

So frightened of dying that we’re willing to hide in our houses, let doctors and nurses do our dirty work without protective gear, abandon our grandparents to die alone in nursing homes.

So frightened of dying that we hand our power over to despots, and sacrifice a world worth living in together.

*

This is a moment of truth.

This tiny “enemy” we’re trying to defeat is just another face of Death. (Not to worry, Death has millions more.)

The entire natural world, for billions of years, has been an intricate, ever-changing dance of life and death. That’s the game here on this planet. We’re all just borrowing material from other lifeforms to make our own bodies. They dance together for a number of years, and then decay and are recycled.

It’s a beautiful system, when I surrender to it.

So many cells and atoms and microbes come together to support my personal creation! So many beings give themselves to feed and nourish me each day!

When I stop and really feel that gift, I’m overwhelmed with love and gratitude.

But rather than live with humble gratitude, and die with grace, we humans get selfish. Personally, relationally, economically, politically. We want to grab and hoard and hold on forever.

And in doing so, we miss the point. We may gain a few years, but we lose our hearts and souls.

We can see that clearly in the selfish 0.1% who hoard more wealth than they can ever use. We see the results of our collective greed as it kills off entire species and trashes the living biosphere.

We see that greed and fear strangle our own lives and relationships. Mememememememememe…

We may have separate bodies, but we’re not designed to live (or die) alone.

For better or worse, we’re part of an intricate, unimaginable, mysterious whole.

And when we turn away from Death, we lose our connection to that whole.

*

When my mother died, and the muscles in her face let go, her individual “personality” vanished: the twinkle in her eyes was gone, the way she smiled, the tilt of her head. But in their place, the bones revealed themselves, and in that distinct marble sculpture (the slope of the forehead, the thrust of the jaw) I saw her mother, and her mother’s mother, and her mother’s mother’s mother.

She was clearly part of something bigger, a temporary form borrowed for a handful of years, one face of a lineage that stretches back for millennia.

The rest was compost and ash, returned to the earth, gifts now available for other creatures to create their own turn in this world.

I want to be that let-go, that surrendered to everything: life, death, love, fear, all the beauty in this unfathomable mystery.

I want to enjoy my time in the sun, and then enjoy my time in the dark dreaming night. I want to remember my place in the whole.

*

All the best things in my life were unpredictable surprises. They came when I surrendered and let life take me somewhere new. New love, new work, new place in the world, sometimes even a new sense of self.

The trick, I believe, is not holding on to what life has already given me.

When my time comes, early or late, ugly or beautiful, I want to surrender again, and let death take me somewhere unfathomably new.

I wish the same grace for you: to turn toward apocalypse, curious, open, not knowing who you are, loving all that you’ve been given, maybe scared, maybe not… ready to let go of the old familiar world, and begin to assemble, from the strange scraps and compost and imaginal cells all around and inside you, something humble and connected and new.

Reach out to others. Share your heart, your joys and fears. Give your gifts. Connect to something bigger than yourself, human and more-than-human too.

Embrace the unknown. Be willing to die. A new world can’t come until we finally let go of this one.

We can let a tiny virus do the heavy lifting for us. We can wait for the next virus, and the next.

Or we can push through this birth canal together.

*

A few days before my mother died, when she was getting frustrated and frightened and losing her anchors to reality, I told her, “You’re doing such a great job, Mom! You’ve never tried to die before, and this is all new to you. I think you’re doing this perfectly.”

She smiled the most glorious little-girl smile, and content with herself, finally stopped fussing with the blankets and let go.

And as she died, she showed me that death is not the enemy here.

Death is a doorway to love.

In the same way that birth blows hearts open and changes lives forever, so does death.

Don’t turn away.

Don’t turn away from all that’s dying.

Face it, feel it, mourn it, grieve it.

Let it blow your heart open.

This is the doorway to a new world.

Here, in your lost and scared and grieving heart.

This is the opening.

We’ve never done this before.

But now the lights are on, and we can see where to begin.

 

Follow David Cates https://medium.com/@kauaidavid

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Poems: These two poems are from the lovely and talented Helen Falandes.

Do the Next Two Things

After the last friends depart

empty glasses and cups

are collected and washed,

the floor swept and that first night alone

the best I can do

is the next two things.

Feed the cat.

Make tea.

Shower.

Dress.

Braid my hair.

Discard the obvious junk mail.

This is how to get through

when the light and dark

are completely different

slants and hues,

when every moment’s routine

holds the unexpected news

of your absence.

Feed the cat.

Empty the dish rack.

Fold the blanket.

Clear the answering machine.

Pick up the empty can

tossed out by the mailbox.

Bless the dust which

can be wiped away,

dirty laundry that can be washed clean,

the path that can be shoveled clear of snow.

Bless the hungry cat.

~ Helen Falandes – 2/07

 

Start Again Now

Start again now

As often as needed

Choking on the dust of falling walls

Gather stones and bricks

Start again now

Glue the broken edges

Match up at least

The larger pieces

Start again now

Dislodge what blocks

The narrow airway

Hear ragged breath

As new music

Start again now

Gather the wooly tangles

Take two sticks

Re-knit any pattern

That forms itself to cloth

                                        ~ Helen Falandes

 

 

 

Movie Review

Movie: Away from Her – synopsis by Google Search

“Long married, Fiona (Julie Christie) and Grant (Gordon Pinsent) find their mutual devotion tested by her struggle with Alzheimer’s disease. When it becomes apparent that the condition is worsening, she checks into a rest home. Grant visits her a month later and finds that his wife has grown close to Aubrey (Michael Murphy), a fellow resident. Jealous and hurt, Grant finally seeks help from Aubrey’s wife (Olympia Dukakis) when Fiona suffers a crisis.

Release date: May 4, 2007 (USA), Director: Sarah Polley, Screenplay: Sarah Polley”, and David Wharnsby, editor

My observance: Julie Christie is extraordinary in this role. You can almost see the deterioration of the disease by the expressions on her face as her memories slip and slide away from her. Great acting

My Offer to You

Would you like to have my poetry books?

Please comment if you are interested in receiving one or both of my books at no cost. For more details and to arrange shipment, I will use your contact information from your comment.

An excerpt from my poem “Savior

… “a small bird whose body

I could not see, saved me.

I sat in my recliner

with all my complaints,

when this tiny chirp

burst into the air.”…

 

Excerpts from my poem “Breakthrough

…”go through this messy and blessed life

thinking we can clean it up

and make it orderly”…

“and we don’t have a lot of say in the matter.

But there is one thing we can do

when grief sails by”…

TheUnbroken

There is a brokenness

out of which comes the unbroken,

a shatteredness

out of which blooms the unshatterable.

There is a sorrow

beyond all grief which leads to joy

and a fragility

out of whose depths emerges strength.

 

There is a hollow space

too vast for words

through which we pass with each loss,

out of whose darkness

we are sanctioned into being.

 

There is a cry deeper than all sound

whose serrated edges cut the heart

as we break open to the place inside

which is unbreakable and whole,

while learning to sing.

Rashani

Accepting the Unacceptable

I recently saw a documentary called Teddy Pendergrass: If You Don’t Know Me (Flooks, Lichtenstein & Tempest, 2018), about the life and death of Teddy Pendergrass.  For those of you who don’t know, Teddy Pendergrass was a soul singer who became popular in the ‘70s. But at 31, at the height of his fame, he had a bad car accident that made him a quadriplegic. Fortunately, he was able to breathe on his own, talk, and raise his arms half-way.

Understandably, he fell into a deep depression. Can you imagine? He went from being a famous, successful star to suddenly becoming some guy in a wheelchair; hardly able to move. He hadn’t invested his money well and didn’t have much to support himself and his family. Talk about changes in identity!

            He ended up going to a therapist who was also in a wheelchair. Session after session, Teddy showed up, but finally came to the conclusion to end his life. His therapist told him that he had a moral obligation to tell his family his decision, and Teddy agreed to have one last session with all of them there.

            When the time came, his family begged him not to take his life, but Teddy was adamant he was not going to change his mind. On the way out the door, he said to his therapist, “Well, I probably won’t see you again, so good-bye”.

            His therapist hung on to the word “probably” and then suggested the most surprising thing: that he set up a time for his family and close friends to get together and stage a funeral for him, during which time Teddy would be covered with a sheet. He was not to say a word while everyone spoke about him as if he were dead.

            After everyone finished, the sheet was lifted and he said, “I want to live”.

            He then concentrated on building up his strength and because he was able to lift his arms, he could exercise his lungs and was eventually able to sing.

            His therapist, who hadn’t been in a wheelchair that long himself, said, “saving his life was like saving my own”.

            I love this story. Not so much because he went on to find fame and fortune again, but because he took his suicidal thoughts as far as he could without actually playing it out. This unorthodox ritual is finally what it took to turn him around and give him the inspiration he needed to find purpose in his life again.

            I wonder what his friends and family told him that changed his mind? What would I say to a loved one in a similar situation? Why hadn’t their desperate pleadings in the therapy session make a difference, but what was said in the funeral did. What would I want to hear if I were playing dead?

            What would you need to hear to help keep you going in the worst of times? Can you tell yourself these things now? How do we accept the unacceptable in our lives? What abilities do you still have, and what can you do to continue to develop them? Can you find purpose and meaning in your life just the way you are? What do you value about yourself? Can you ask your loved ones now what they value about you, what it is they would miss if you were dead?

            This movie, too, reminded me of the book Tuesdays with Morrie, a true account by Mitch Albom (1997). Morrie was Mitch’s mentor who ended up having a terminal illness. Morrie decided that he wanted a memorial service while he was alive, so that he could hear what it was that people loved about him. His thought was: why wait until I am dead when I can’t hear what they say?

            Would you want to do the same thing?

Would I?

Salt Heart

I was tired,
half sleeping in the sun.
A single bee
delved the lavender nearby,
and beyond the fence,
a trowel’s shoulder knocked a white stone.
Soon, the ringing stopped.
And from somewhere,
a quiet voice said the one word.
Surely a command,
though it seemed more a question,
a wondering perhaps—”What about joy?”
So long it had been forgotten,
even the thought raised surprise.
But however briefly, there,
in the untuned devotions of bee
and the lavender fragrance,
the murmur of better and worse was unimportant.
From next door, the sound of raking,
and neither courage nor cowardice mattered.
Failure – uncountable failure – did not matter.
Soon enough that gate swung closed,
the world turned back to heart-salt
of wanting, heart-salts of will and grief.
My friend would continue dying, at last
only exhausted, even his wrists thinned with pain.
The river Suffering would take what it
wished of him, then go. And I would stay
and drink on, as the living do, until the rest
would enter into that water—the lavender swept in,
the bee, the swallowed labors of my neighbor.
The ordinary moment swept in, whatever it drowsily holds.
I begin to believe the only sin is distance, refusal.
All others stemming from this. Then come.
Rivers, come. Irrevocable futures, come. Come even joy.
Even now, even here, and though it vanish like him.

Jane Hirshfield

Excerpt from My “Book”

MEMORY:  THE JOURNEY BEGINS

I am thirteen and in the eighth grade and it is recess.  It is raining, so instead of going outside, I am in the classroom watching a few classmates pitch pennies against the wall.  The next thing I know, I am waking up in the nurse’s office groggy, confused and with a splitting headache.

My parents are told I went into convulsions.  Although they say nothing about what they are feeling, I feel their worry tighten around me like a pack of nervous dogs.  I feel no concern myself — after all, the next day after sleeping deeply I am fine and feel “normal” —what’s there to be afraid of?  However, my mother and I go to a doctor who refers us to a neurologist, and I take a test called an EEG (short for electroencephalogram) where wires are attached to my head and my brain waves are recorded.  Nothing unusual shows up in the results.  The incident remains a mystery. 

But not for long.  That summer I have another episode.  This time I have a feeling before it (what I later learn is called an aura) and a not unpleasant sensation of spinning out of my body—much like the feeling younger children get after twirling around and around.  Again, I come to groggy and headachy and all the muscles in my body ache like I’ve run a marathon.

This time my parents witness me convulsing, which of course escalates their fear.  Another appointment for an EEG is made.  Before I have a chance of going in for the test, I have another episode.  At this point I am still unaffected emotionally and don’t understand my parents’ mounting agitation.  Like the second incident, I get a split-second warning and then again feel the rush of spinning out of my body.  Yes, I come out of it disoriented and by body aching, but again the next day I am fine.  It never occurs to me that this could turn into any great difficulty.  Up until now I have been quite healthy and vivacious, the thought never enters my mind anything would change that.

This time when I take an EEG, the brain waves show up very spiky.  I am given a diagnosis:  epilepsy, and I am put on medication.  Unbeknownst to me, I have taken my first step onto the path of chronic illness.  My life has changed forever.

INTRODUCTION AND INITIATION TO LOSS

It took me many years before I realized my condition was chronic.  At first I thought my seizures would go away.  I had been “normal” up until then, and with that sense of normalcy came the assumption that I would return to that way of being.  Long term illness disability happened to other people…people to be pitied.  That wasn’t me.  As first, when I started on medication, I assumed that would fix by condition, but it didn’t and on top of that, there were side effects.  When I was in my twenties and still having seizures, I discovered “alternative medicine”.  I was very drawn to the concept that if one followed a natural course of treatment, one could cure oneself of anything.  There were plenty of testimonies that claimed this to be true.  I had no doubt if I followed a natural pathway to health that my body would “balance out” in some sort of magical way and I’d be seizure free.  I plunged wholeheartedly in this direction and giving up my anti-convulsant medication, which I believed would damage my liver, I began to take homeopathic remedies.  Along with that I stopped eating junk food and ate whole organic foods as much as possible.

Yet still my seizures continued.  When homeopathy wasn’t the cure-all; I assumed it would be, I just figured another alternative to Western medicine would be the one for me.  It was a long grueling process of trial and error with numerous medications and remedies before I came to realize that I would perhaps never cure my seizures, but instead find a way to manage them and that in fact my condition was chronic.  And until I would admit that, I couldn’t acknowledge loss.

Perhaps your story is like mine.  Or perhaps you’ve had a car accident or have suddenly contracted a debilitating illness.  Whichever the case, your symptoms persist no matter what you do.  At some point you realize your life has taken an abrupt detour and may never get back on track.  Wherever we are in the process we realize our lives have been changed.  And with that change we experience loss.

Our loss comes in many forms.  The obvious one is the physical changes we experience:  we no longer function the way we did in the past.  Our bodies don’t move the way they used to, we experience pain, have nausea.  When our symptoms are severe enough, it affects us to our core:  what can we depend on now?  It is not unlike experiencing an earthquake:  the very ground under our feet is shaky when we’ve always relied on it to be solid and assumed it would remain so. 

But that’s not all.  We may lose our job and our financial security, which of course effects us also on a survival level.  We may have to go on disability, unemployment or workman’s comp.  Often getting the help we need financially takes time, is a source of great frustration and adds to the fear we are already feeling.  If we had health insurance through our job, we may lose it.  Medical bills pile up and we’re not sure how we are going to pay them.  Sometimes we feel ashamed of our loss of financial footing.  Along with the loss of job security can be a loss of identity.  If our job was meaningful and fulfilling, we not only question how we can support ourselves, but who are we without this job title?  We start to lose our place in the world, and we’re not sure where we belong.

We may have started on medications for our on-going symptoms, which may help, but have side effects.  Ironically, something we take in hopes of improving our condition, may in other ways hinder us.  Pain medications may leave us in a fog.  Other medications may keep us up at night or cause our joints to ache.  This too adds to our loss.  We weigh it out if it’s worth it to keep up with the medications, and the process can be agonizing.

Friendships may fall by the wayside.  As first when we became ill, we got a lot of sympathy.  But as the days, months and years go by, that sympathy may dissipate. Friends we had so much in common with before, now back off, not knowing how to relate to us now.  Our former co-workers who we had so much in common with before, begin to fade from our lives.  Someone we used to go to the gym with regularly may not know how to be with us.  After not being able to go to social gatherings because we don’t feel well, the invitations slowly don’t come anymore.  We may not be able to go, but we feel left out.  We sense people’s fears and even judgement, or it may come out more blatantly.  We feel their pity in the form of well-intentioned advice or awkwardness which may cause us to retreat and feel betrayed.  We’re not sure how to relate either.  Our feelings are hurt and yet me may feel too in need of companionship and too confused ourselves in this new emotional landscape we find ourselves in to know how to communicate our needs. 

It may be hard to determine at first that what we are experiencing is loss.  We tend to associate loss with the death of a loved one or a break up, but a decline in health, whether rapid or gradual is not as well recognized as such.  There is much written about the phases of grief that Elizabeth Kubler-Ross presented when she studied those facing terminal illness.  The same can be applied to people with chronic health issues—although with us we cycle through some of the stages time and time again, sometimes all during one day.

We begin with a kind of denial or shock, the feeling of disbelief that this is happening to us, that I spoke of earlier.  Then we experience a range of emotions:  anger, resentment, bitterness, at times, and certainly sadness and fear.  We become depressed and experience shame and despair sometimes.  We are affected physically—we may feel tired, worn down.  We may lose weight, we may gain weight.  A kind of raw vulnerability develops—small upsets can affect us deeply and we become too overwhelmed to perform even the simplest of chores:  dishes and laundry pile up.  We feel lonely and isolated.  All these (symptoms) can come under the heading of “loss”.

We may not recognize ourselves and at times seem to lose even our personality.  Feeling lousy most of the time, our patience wears thin, and we become disagreeable or argumentative when we used to be lively and playful.  We are changing in front of our own eyes and we don’t like what we see.  This of course has an effect on our relationships, for we no longer exhibit the type of behavior we once did that people expect from us.

We also grieve our potential—who we could have been if we had continued to be in good health:  we may have got that promotion, bought that house.  We may have traveled more, done more volunteer work.  We may have had children, moved to our dream location.  Or we may have just continued as we were, because what we had felt was more fulfilling than what we seem to have now.  It is an odd phenomenon, this grieving for a possible future and yet it is as real as grieving for what once was.  It is as if alongside our real life with all it’s limitations, there is another life that is active and full of endless possibilities.  It is this life that we grieve for.                 

Acknowledging our health may never be what it once was and the components of loss that come with it is crucial to our moving forward in our life.  Coming to terms with our quality of health takes courage and requires a sobering honesty with oneself.  On the other hand, it also brings a certain amount of relief.  We let up on ourselves and stop pretending we are able-bodied.  We stop pushing ourselves so hard to try to live up to the expectations we once had when we had a higher level of energy.  We can be honest about our limitations and therefore begin to reconstruct a life that better reflects who we are now.  If we need financial assistance, we do what we can to get it.  If the friends we had before we were ill don’t support us or understand us, we begin to set about finding ones that do. 

CONTEMPLATION ON LOSS

When we take time to explore our loss, we find there is a poignant tenderness to it.  It is a feeling so deep in us that it can feel almost private and we may feel an awkwardness in knowing how to express it.  By investigating our broken heart, a moment here, a moment there, we have to set aside our fear constructed armor.  When we are able to touch our grief with a kind of careful compassion as we might touch a beloved, we discover the sacred within.  From this sacred place, can we see that the loss we feel is something we all share as part of the human condition?  My loss may come from a different source than yours, but the feeling is the same.  Can we, even if for a moment, recognize this shared awareness and let it move us in such a way that we can go through life with a heightened sense of compassion?  When we see the face of loss on others, regardless of the reason, can we now draw from our connectedness rather than our (imagined) separateness and reach out to others any way we can?  When we are able to do so, this kind of heartfelt awareness gives us a greater sense of meaning and purpose in our life.

Gradually, over time, we may come to realize that this sacred place is a place we’ve been longing to connect with and is a deep well of compassion that is endless and infinite.  Can we see that our path of loss has brought us to That-Which-Is-Never-Lost?  We have put up walls continually against such tenderness thinking it’s best to protect ourselves from pain, but now we realize that that never served us well.  Now that we can dip into that sacred well of compassion, we see that therein lies a strength and knowingness that serves us far better than our wall ever did.